Bailey heads out for the Tour Divide 2016

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Bailey and his Tour Divide rig

It’s 9am on Saturday June 11th, and Bailey already has 150 miles of rugged Canadian terrain under his belt just 24 hours after starting the Tour Divide 2016 in wet and almost freezing conditions. But I’m getting ahead of myself, so let me back up.

The Tour Divide is a self supported mountain bike race spanning the full length of the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route, covering a total of 2768.4 miles with 200,000 feet of elevation gain. The route is the world’s longest off-pavement cycling route, mapped over the course of four years, and published in 1998 by the Adventure Cycling Association. Every year on the second Friday in June, a group of racers set off in the Grand Depart and attempts to complete the race as quickly as possible. The race is fully self supported, meaning there are no support vehicles for riders, no warm vans waiting at the end of the day to feed you and get your bike in shape for the following day. It is a test not only of speed and endurance, but of will and mental fortitude.

13443187_10208141723893064_1153209551234163978_oBailey set off yesterday on his single speed Salsa El Mariachi into the wilds of Canada for an epic and challenging adventure that will take him pedaling along the spine of our country’s continental divide. Watch his progress on the live tracking website trackleaders.com.  Read and hear a bit more from Bailey and his fellow riders at unlearnpavement.com.

 

 

Wheel Building Special

Wheel build special is on! We can help you drop some weight off your race bike, bomb-proofify the wheel set you work on, or set up a dynamo lighting wheel for your commuter. We’ve got the knowledge base and the experience to help you up your wheel game.

Buy your spokes, rim, and hub from us and get $60 off a single wheel build or $100 off a set. Call or stop by for pricing regarding rebuilding to existing parts. The special is on until March 1st.

wheelbuild

One Month

Well we’ve been open for a whole month and I wanted to take a moment tonight to stop and smell the roses. I can’t begin to express our gratitude to all the people who helped and continue to help us with this bicycle shop. I wouldn’t want to get all mushy on the internet either.

Anyway, if you have time this spring you should take a bicycle tour. I was flipping through some of my good friends’ flickr pages and found this one of our fellow worker Rusty. Our friend Jim took the photograph. It made me feel like throwing a rack on a bike and filling a pannier with way to much gear to go too short a distance to warrant it all. (You never know when you’ll need a roll of quarters or a 24 pack of AA batteries on tour!) I jest. Bicycle touring in North America helps bring a city slicker back in touch with the slower moving, humble, and often lonely parts of the country. On the other hand it can give you a slow motion view of how giant corporations can tear the identity from small towns and counties. Both views can be quite moving and bring a new vigor to your everyday life back in the city. Whether it is questing for a better local economy, the freshest healthy food, improved transportation infrastructure, or just a perfect pub to converse in, sometimes we all need to hit refresh. And we’re cyclists so we will do so on bicycles.

Nothing like a front of warm air to churn up the long conversations about spoke count, rim width, and, of course, the ever entertaining freewheel vs freehub discussion involving the great bicycle tour.

Stop in if you want to share bicycle tour stories some day, I’d love to chat. If you are going on one soon let us know if you need help with anything.

-Comrade Jesse